Press Releases - 2013

 

Press Releases - November 2013

LCLAA JOINS NATIONAL FAST CALLING FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM

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Press Release  

For Immediate Release

 November 26, 2013 

LCLAA JOINS NATIONAL FAST CALLING FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the national leading organization for Latino working families, will join the leaders of the “Fast4Families” to call on the House of Representatives to pass immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship. LCLAA Executive Director Hector E. Sanchez and staff from the national LCLAA office will participate in a two day fast to remind Congressional leaders that Latino working families expect Congress to deliver on their promise to pass immigration reform.

“The lack of action on immigration reform in the Republican led House of Representatives is very troubling for Latino working families,” said the Executive Director of LCLAA, Hector E. Sanchez. “After months of debate and a Senate bill, the House has done nothing to pass reform with a pathway to citizenship. This year Members of Congress will enjoy Thanksgiving with their loved ones while over 2 million individuals have been deported and ripped away from their families. After months of mobilizations, civic participation drives, and demonstrations, LCLAA and other immigration advocates join in fasting to underscore our communities hunger for reform. LCLAA stands ready to continue escalating our activism until we achieve meaningful immigration reform.”

In a press conference today, the Fast for Families declared December 1st to the 3rd to be “National Days to Act, Fast and Pray. LCLAA will join the national action days as part of the growing number of mobilizations, civic participation drives, and demonstrations across the country to achieve immigration reform.

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize andmobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort toimpact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of morethan 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  | 202.508.6989

GLOBAL BOYCOTT OF HYATT HOTELS ENDED THANKS TO STRONG NEW AGREEMENT

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Press Release 

For Immediate Release

November 26, 2013

 GLOBAL BOYCOTT OF HYATT HOTELS ENDED THANKS TO

 STRONG NEW AGREEMENT

WASHINGTON, D.C.— After reaching an agreement with Hyatt Hotels, UNITE HERE, the union representing Hyatt workers, has ended the global boycott of the hotel chain which NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) and the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) joined earlier this year.  NCLR, MALDEF and LCLAA joined the boycott in response to widespread evidence of harmful working conditions for hotel housekeepers, who are predominantly women of color, including Latinas.  The agreement will result in strong new contracts for Hyatt workers that will make hotel jobs safer and more secure.  The agreement will also offer some nonunion Hyatt workers a fair process for unionizing.

 “NCLR is pleased to have helped Hyatt workers achieve this major victory that will improve working conditions, wages and their right to a voice on the job,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR.  “By joining the boycott, we sent a clear message that all workers should be fairly compensated and treated with dignity and respect.  We are proud to stand by Hyatt workers and will continue to push for stronger workplace protections that guarantee the rights and safety of workers within the hotel industry.”

 “The end of this boycott marks a victory not just for the workers—whose hard-fought efforts led to this well-deserved agreement—but also for our economy, for fairness and for the basic constitutional principles that have united our nation and facilitated its longstanding success,” stated Thomas A. Saenz, President and General Counsel of MALDEF.

 “This is an important victory for workers.  After many years of mobilization by the courageous hard workers of Hyatt, many of whom are Latinas, one of the world’s largest hotel chains is addressing the problems of basic worker rights, fair wages and safer working conditions,” said Milton Rosado, National President of LCLAA.  “We are pleased Hyatt has agreed to offer new contracts for Latino workers and has promised to make hotel jobs safer.  We applaud Hyatt’s new commitment to allow nonunion Hyatt workers to unionize.  While we celebrate this hard-earned victory, LCLAA will continue to fight for better wages and working conditions for all hotel workers.”

 While the global boycott has ended, labor disputes at several local Hyatt hotels persist (see the online Union Hotel Guide).  Going forward, NCLR, MALDEF and LCLAA will remain vigilant and adhere to a policy of avoiding hotels where labor disputes exist.  

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations  (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter. 

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

NATIONAL LATINO GROUPS ISSUE CALL FOR BIPARTISAN LEADERS TO HELP PRESSURE FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM VOTE IN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

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Press Release 

For Immediate Release

November 14, 2013

 

NATIONAL LATINO GROUPS ISSUE CALL FOR BIPARTISAN LEADERS TO HELP PRESSURE FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM VOTE IN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today, the NCLR Action Fund, LULAC, LCLAA, Hispanic Federation and Mi Familia Vota, called on national party leaders from both sides of the aisle to step up pressure for a House vote on a commonsense immigration reform bill with an earned path to citizenship for current undocumented residents.  Despite overwhelming national support for the passage of comprehensive immigration reform and a bipartisan 68-32 vote to pass reform in the Senate last June, the House of Representatives has thus far failed to move legislation forward or schedule a vote on immigration reform as political posturing seems to be winning  over pragmatic policy-making.

With time running out on this year’s legislative clock, this coalition representing millions of Latinos across the U.S. is asking leaders, some who are current office holders, to pressure Congress to vote on a comprehensive bill, such as HR 15 (House legislation that features nearly 200 co-sponsors and I comprised entirely of provisions that have received bipartisan support in the past).  The letter signers are asking for additional bipartisan support, urging these leaders to weigh in with their political colleagues in Congress and tell them to set aside politics for the good of our nation.

The political leaders receiving the letter include Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ), former Democratic Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Gov. Jeb Bush (R-FL0, Gov. John Kasich (R-OH), Gov. Brian Sandoval (R-NV), former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA), Gov. Rick Snider (R-MI), Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-NY), Gov. Martin O’Malley (D-MD), Gov. Deval Patrick (D-MA), Gov. Mike Pence (R-IN), and Gov. Scott Walker  (R-WI).

The letter reads in part: “We’ve reached a critical moment in the immigration debate, and it’s time to stop bowing to the extremists and do what’s right for the country by passing comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship.  But if House Leadership allows this minority to set the agenda, then they should expect to feel the heat come Election Day in 2014.” Full text of a letter here

The Latino electorate is expected to continue growing exponentially as each month more than 50,000 Latinos turn 18 and become eligible to vote.  As the economy continues to recover and healthcare reform has become a reality, focus among Hispanic voters is likely to shift primarily to immigration. A poll earlier this year, showed 63 percent of Latino voters saying they personally know someone who is an undocumented immigrant, either a member of their family or a close personal friend.

 “We are at a critical juncture in the immigration reform debate and we need leadership from both sides of the aisle to help deliver the commonsense solution for our immigration system that our nation deserves.  Latino voters made their voices heard last election and helped propel this issue to the front of the national consciousness.  We can’t allow the extremist Members of Congress with short-term memories forget that help propel legislation forward,” said Matthew McClellan, Executive Director, NCLR Action Fund.

“Despite broad support in the growing Latino community and amongst labor, business, faith and law enforcement communities, the House of Representatives has yet to act to pass a common-sense solution to fix our broken immigration system. We are hopeful that recent bi-partisan efforts to advance a comprehensive immigration reform proposal will continue to gain steam. Hispanic Federation, along with our sister organizations across the country, will redouble efforts to pass a bill in the House and are calling on state and local leaders of both parties to join the chorus calling for immediate action in Washington,” said José Calderón, President of the Hispanic Federation.

“A year ago, the Latino community showed the strength of our movement with a record 12.5 million Latino voters casting ballots in the November, 2012 election. Democrats ran on the platform of fixing the immigration system this year, and Republicans found in the election results a mandate for reform from the fastest growing part of the electorate. As we have worked for immigration reform in congressional districts across the country, our movement has grown stronger than ever. Moving forward now is the best solution for our communities and for lawmakers on both sides of the aisle,” said Ben Monterroso, Executive Director of Mi Familia Vota. “And if they don’t, we will educate voters about the inaction by Congress and show up at the election polls in 2014.”

“One issue that has the overwhelming support of the American people, and which has united business, faith-based, and civil rights organizations is comprehensive immigration reform,” said Brent Wilkes, LULAC National Executive Director.  “Unfortunately, the House of Representatives has failed to get passed political discord and move in any meaningful way to pass comprehensive immigration reform.  As the Latino community has demonstrated over the past several elections, it is a powerful voting bloc that cannot be ignored.  LULAC along with its sister organizations will continue its efforts to pass immigration reform including pressing for a vote on HR 15.”

 “The Senate’s bipartisan immigration reform bill was sent to the House of Representatives over four months ago and critics in the House have failed to move forward any viable, alternative legislative solutions on their end. Some two million people have been deported under their watch and our community can no longer tolerate inaction on such a crucial issue. Immigration reform is not only an important priority for Latino families, but also for our nation's economy and future. We call on both Democratic and Republican leaders across the country to weigh in today with their representatives, and with the Speaker of the House, to reinforce the urgent point that now is the time to pass a common-sense immigration reform bill with a pathway to citizenship,” said Hector Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA

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The National Council of La Raza Action Fund (NCLR Action Fund) works to expand the power and influence of the Latino community to shape public policy and opinion in ways that strengthen the nation and improve the social, civic, and economic well-being of Hispanics through grassroots and national advocacy and lobbying.

 The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities.  Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 900 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future.  For more information, visit www.LULAC.org.

The mission of the Hispanic Federation is to empower and advance the Hispanic community. Hispanic Federation provides grants and services to a broad network of Latino non-profit agencies serving the most vulnerable members of the Hispanic community and advocates nationally with respect to the vital issues of education, health, immigration, economic empowerment, civic engagement and the environment. For more information, please visit www.hispanicfederation.org.

 Mi Familia Vota is a national non-profit organization that unites Latino, immigrant, and allied communities to promote social and economic justice through increased civic participation by promoting citizenship, voter registration, and voter participation. Mi Familia Vota is one of the premiere Latino civic engagement organizations in the country with operations in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and Texas.

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations  (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

Press Releases - October 2013

LATINO GROUPS ANNOUNCE ‘GET OUT THE VOTE’ PUSH IN VIRGINIA

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Media Advisory 

For Immediate Release

October 30, 2013

 

LATINO GROUPS ANNOUNCE ‘GET OUT THE VOTE’ PUSH IN VIRGINIA

On-the-ground efforts to boost Hispanic turnout at the polls; highlight immigration issue

WASHINGTON, D.C.— NCLR Action Fund (NCLRAF), League of United Latino American Citizens (LULAC), and the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), will host a telephonic briefing for members of the press this Thursday, October 31st, 2013 at 1:30 pm.  The groups have launched a multi-platform ‘get out the vote’ campaign aimed at increasing Latino voter turnout for the November 5th election and pushing immigration reform to the forefront of issues.    From 2000 to 2012, the Latino population in the state grew by 92%; today the state’s Hispanics number near 650,000, a figure that is expected to grow exponentially according to projections.   While Virginia’s Latino population ranks 28th nationally, it ranks 16th in Hispanic eligible voters.  Over one-third of the state’s eligible voters are under 29, and given the significant youth share of the population, Latino electoral power will no doubt be a strong force in elections to come.

According to Latino Decisions polling, during the 2012 elections as the nation was enduring a tough recession, Latinos identified the economy as their top issue of concern while immigration came in at a close second.  Today with an economy in recovery, immigration has once again become top-of-mind for many of the state’s Hispanic families who are closely monitoring the debate and candidates’ positions on the issue. 

The groups will highlight their efforts which include phone banking, mailers, radio advertisements and social media centered campaigns, among others.  Media who would like to attend the telephonic briefing should RSVP to Camila Gallardo at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 305-215-4259. 

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHO:             Matthew McClellan, Executive Director, NCLRAF

                        Hector Sanchez, Executive Director, LCLAA

                        Sindy M. Benavides, Director of Civic Engagement & Community Mobilization

LULAC

 

WHAT:          Virginia Latino ‘Get out the Vote’ Efforts and Immigration Reform

 

WHEN:          Thursday, October 31st, 2013

                        1:30 pm

 

WHERE:       Participant Dial-in:      866-952-1908

Conference I.D.:         Virginia

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize andmobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort toimpact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of morethan 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and on Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

Press Releases - September 2013

Press Releases - December 2013

LATINO GROUPS ISSUE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES “INCOMPLETE” GRADE ON IMMIGRATION AND A PLEDGE CARD FOR ACTION

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Press Release 

For Immediate Release

Decemebr 10, 2013

 

LATINO GROUPS ISSUE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES “INCOMPLETE” GRADE ON IMMIGRATION AND A PLEDGE CARD FOR ACTION  

WASHINGTON, D.C.— National Latino organizations engaged in voter education and registration efforts today reported how the 113th Congress—including every member of the House of Representatives and the Senate—has dealt with the issue of immigration so far. The mid-term report card gives a “green checkmark” to the U.S. Senate for passing comprehensive immigration reform legislation earlier this year. However, the House of Representatives receives only an “I” for incomplete because it has not acted on reform except for a spending vote to undo the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which would result in the deportation of all DREAMers. Therefore, the only vote allowed on the House floor to date was one to kill an overwhelmingly popular initiative among Latino and many other voters.

The mid-term report puts Congress on notice that these organizations will be “scoring” all upcoming votes related to immigration in 2014 and providing this information to the Hispanic community. In the meantime, the groups are delivering a letter to Speaker of the House John Boehner, signed by over 200 Latino organizations, urging action on immigration reform. They will also distribute pledge cards to individual members of the House asking them to commit to advancing reform.

The organizations include the Hispanic Federation, the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the League of United Latin American Citizens(LULAC), Mi Familia Vota Education Fund, NALEO Educational Fund, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and Voto Latino. Each of these organizations is active in civic engagement campaigns that include citizenship drives, voter registration and mobilization and immigration advocacy. There were 1.5 million more Latino voters in 2012 than in 2008, compared with a decrease of two million voters among non-Hispanic Whites during this time. The Latino electorate will continue growing at a fast pace, with an average of 880,000 Latino citizens turning 18 every year for the next 15 years.

 "Today’s progress report essentially means we are calling in the House leadership for a parent-teacher conference. The ‘caution mark’ means the House still has time to redeem itself on immigration, but needs to turn around their performance and show immediate progress in order for individual House members to make the grade with Latino voters and with the nation,” said Bertha Alisia Guerrero, Director of National Advocacy, Hispanic Federation. “In the short run, individual members can improve their standing by co-sponsoring H.R. 15 or signing a pledge stating their support for reform and publicly committing to move it forward, but the final grade will be based on whether reform is achieved.”

 “How Congress handles immigration during the next dozen months will go a long way toward determining national politics for the next dozen years,” said Clarissa Martinez-De-Castro, Director of Civic Engagement and Immigration, NCLR. “Every serious political and media observer saw that the Hispanic vote and immigration were decisive, game-changing factors in the 2012 national election outcome. So far, only one chamber has reacted to the new electoral reality and taken action to fix our immigration system in a bipartisan and politically popular manner. Today’s progress report reminds Congress that we are monitoring their actions, or lack thereof, and will issue a formal evaluation of how they address one of the greatest concerns in our community.”

 “The Latino community’s commitment to immigration reform has only grown stronger since the 2012 election. Last week, Cristian Avila, a Mi Familia Vota team member from Arizona and a DREAMer, ended 22 days of fasting—as others stepped in—to put a human face on the immorality of the current immigration system and Congress’s inaction. During 2013, our groups have continued building the Latino electorate through citizenship workshops, voter registration, education and mobilization campaigns. We have rallied, marched and pressed members of Congress for reform. We will grow even stronger next year, and if members do not want F’s on their report cards that we deliver to the community, they need to deliver quickly and responsibly on comprehensive immigration reform," said Ben Monterroso, Executive Director of Mi Familia Vota Education Fund.

“Latino voters accounted for 8.4 percent of all voters in the 2012 election, making a decisive impact in the race for the White House and other state and municipal contests,” said Max Sevillia, Director of Policy and Legislative Affairs, NALEO Educational Fund. “In the lead-up to Election Day, the Latino community’s political influence will continue to grow, with the eligible Latino electorate set to reach 25.2 million. Immigration is a deeply personal issue for Latino voters, and our growing electorate will be closely monitoring legislative movement on this issue in Congress in the coming months.”

“For Latinos, immigration is personal,” said Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino. “We work with Latino millennials, who are fueling the accelerated growth of our community’s electorate with an average of 880,000 young Latinos turning 18 every year and know that the choices Congress makes today have a powerful effect on shaping these new and future voters’ political map. These young voters are engaged and are seeing their family and friends suffer the consequences of inaction, even though the votes exist to end our nation’s immigration crisis. How Congress handles the immigration issue now will have a huge impact on political elections for years to come.”

“Immigration reform is clearly a morally and politically defining issue for Latinos, but the benefits go way beyond politics,” said Brent Wilkes, Executive Director of LULAC. “The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated immigration reform would reduce the deficit by $200 billion and increase GDP by $700 billion in the first decade, while inaction is depriving the nation of these economic benefits. As Congress continues budget negotiations the politicians must understand how immediate action on immigration reform can help build our economy and create jobs.”

“It is time to act,” said Hector Sanchez, Executive Director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. “We know the votes exist in the House to get this done, and the time for obstruction is over. There is no way to avoid this issue because labor, faith and community groups are united, and we and our allies across the political spectrum are bringing the voice and action of our communities and constituents to the doorstep of Congress. Nobody is off the hook and even with a bill passed in the Senate, nobody is unfurling a ‘Mission Accomplished’ banner for any party or politician. The damage caused by our broken immigration system is too high—every single day—to keep wasting time on the road to reform.”

PLEDGE LANGUAGE “I support immigration reform that includes a clear road map to earned citizenship for hardworking, tax-paying immigrants; keeps families together; promotes the full integration of newcomers into American society; and creates an internal and border law enforcement regimen that focuses on preventing criminals, drug cartels and other bad actors from entering the U.S. or engaging in criminal activities. I also call on House leadership to schedule a vote on immigration reform.”

“It is time to act,” said Hector Sanchez, Executive Director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. “We know the votes exist in the House to get this done, and the time for obstruction is over. There is no way to avoid this issue because labor, faith and community groups are united, and we and our allies across the political spectrum are bringing the voice and action of our communities and constituents to the doorstep of Congress. Nobody is off the hook and even with a bill passed in the Senate, nobody is unfurling a ‘Mission Accomplished’ banner for any party or politician. The damage caused by our broken immigration system is too high—every single day—to keep wasting time on the road to reform.”

“It is time to act,” said Hector Sanchez, Executive Director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. “We know the votes exist in the House to get this done, and the time for obstruction is over. There is no way to avoid this issue because labor, faith and community groups are united, and we and our allies across the political spectrum are bringing the voice and action of our communities and constituents to the doorstep of Congress. Nobody is off the hook and even with a bill passed in the Senate, nobody is unfurling a ‘Mission Accomplished’ banner for any party or politician. The damage caused by our broken immigration system is too high—every single day—to keep wasting time on the road to reform.”

CONTACTS

Hispanic Federation: Bertha Guerrero, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202-641-7186

LCLAA: Victor Baten, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202-508-6989

LULAC: Paloma Zuleta, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202-812-4477

Mi Familia Vota: Lizette Escobedo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 858-583-5014

NALEO Educational Fund: Amanda Bosquez, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 361-548-6989

NCLR: Joseph Rendeiro, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202-776-1566

Voto Latino: Jimmy Hernandez, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 305-720-0699

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 900 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.LULAC.org.

Mi Familia Vota is a national non-profit organization that unites Latino, immigrant, and allied communities to promote social and economic justice through increased civic participation by promoting citizenship, voter registration, and voter participation. Mi Familia Vota is one of the premiere Latino civic engagement organizations in the country with operations in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, and Texas. Visit online: www.mifamiliavota.org | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube |

NALEO Educational Fund is the nation's leading non-partisan, non-profit organization that facilitates the full participation of Latinos in the American political process, from citizenship to public service. Visit us online: www.naleo.org | Facebook | Twitter.

NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

Voto Latino is a national civic engagement organization that celebrates 10 years in 2014 of galvanizing Latino Millennials and their family members and friends into the political process to effect positive change. United by the belief that Latino issues are American issues and American issues are Latino issues, Voto Latino has influenced millions of Latino Millennials through its digital and traditional media campaigns, through the tireless work of its artist coalition, and the organization’s leadership initiatives. To learn more about Voto Latino, visit www.VotoLatino.org. Also engage Voto Latino on Facebook at www.facebook.com/VotoLatino , on Twitter at www.twitter.com/VotoLatino and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/VotoLatino.

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Press Releases - August 2013

Press Releases - July 2013

FARMWORKERS COME TO CAPITOL HILL SEEKING SAFEGAURDS

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

July 15, 2013

FARMWORKERS COME TO CAPITOL HILL SEEKING SAFEGAURDS

Farmworkers gather from across the nation to meet with Congress and demand basic protections from exposure to hazardous pesticides

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today and tomorrow on Capitol Hill, a dozen farmworkers from across the nation are meeting with their members of Congress to call for the implementation of stronger protections for farmworkers from the health impacts of exposure to hazardous pesticides. An estimated 5.1 billion pounds of pesticides are applied to crops annually in the United States, and thousands of farmworkerseach year experience pesticide poisoning. The farmworkers and allies visiting D.C. this week are callingon Congress to protect the health of farmworkers and their families by strengthening the Worker Protection Standard regulations. These rules were established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set agricultural worker safety standards for pesticide use, but have not been updated orrevised for more than 20 years, despite overwhelming evidence of their inadequacy.

A significant number of the nation’s 1-2 million farmworkers are exposed to toxic pesticides. The federal government estimates that there are 10-20,000 physician-diagnosed acute pesticide poisoningsamong workers in the agricultural industry annually; a figure that likely understates the actual number of acute poisonings since many affected farmworkers may not seek care from a physician. Workers exposetheir families to pesticides in the form of residues on their tools, clothes, shoes, and skin. The close proximity of agricultural fields to residential areas results in aerial drift of pesticides into farmworkers’ homes, schools, and playgrounds. Short-term effects of pesticide exposures cause stinging eyes, rashes, blisters, nausea, headaches, respiratory problems and even death. As a result of cumulative long-termexposures, farmworkers and their children are at risk of developing serious chronic health problems such as cancer, neurological impairments and Parkinson’s disease.

“The continued neglect of farmworker protections by our regulatory bodies is unacceptable. After a significant number of cases and evidence of the serious health impacts farmworkers face by pesticidepoisoning, it’s time for the Environmental Protections Agency to fully enforce established regulations and farmworker protections,” said President of LCLAA, Milton Rosado

Most workers in the U.S. can look to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for standards to protect them from exposure to hazardous chemicals. Protection for farmworkers from pesticides is left to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority under the Worker ProtectionStandard of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (“FIFRA”), a standard that is far more lenient than OSHA rules and is fundamentally inadequate. 

The farmworkers and advocates are calling for the following changes to the Worker Protection Standard:

• Require pesticide safety training at least once a year (instead of every five years) that workers more readily understand
• Ensure that workers receive information about specific pesticides used in their work
• Require medical monitoring of workers who handle neurotoxic pesticides
• Require safety precautions and protective equipment limiting farmworkers’ contact with pesticides
• Include information about farmworker families’ exposures to pesticides in the required WPS training materials

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize andmobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort toimpact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of morethan 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and on Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

Press Releases - June 2013

ASIAN AMERICAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AND LATINO COMMUNITY HOLDS IMMIGRATION TOWN HALL

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

June 27, 2013

ASIAN AMERICAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AND LATINO COMMUNITY HOLDS IMMIGRATION TOWN HALL

Los Angeles, CA - The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the Central American Resource Center LA (CARECEN),Asian Americans Advancing Justice LA, and the California Federation of Teachers (CFT) conducted an immigration reform town hall with both the Latino and the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community of Los Angeles. Community leaders discussed recent developments in the House of Representatives impacting immigration reform legislation.

“This coalition of both the Latino and AAPI community is entrenched in the future of immigration reform as it will affect 11 million residents and their families that are living in limbo,” said Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA. “Both the Latino and AAPI communities want a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million aspiring Americans. Latinos and AAPIs will closely watch their representatives’ vote and actions in the upcoming weeks as the immigration reform debate continues. Our communities stand ready to mobilize and engage Members of Congress.

“The resistance to immigration reform by the GOP is based more on party ideology than economics,” said LULAC Executive Director, Brent Wilkes. “In August, Congress will depart for their districts to gauge the public sentiment on immigration reform and this is our opportunity to make our voice count. By organizing town halls, we can ensure that the Latino community is well versed on the issue and members hear our collective voice as to the need for comprehensive immigration reform.”

"The Latino and Asian American Pacific Islander communities stand united in our demand for immigration reform and to stop deportations. We are a nation of immigrants, and we are betraying our nation's ideals in perpetuating unfair immigration policies,” said Director of the UCLA Labor Center, Kent Wong.

The Town Hall featured panelists from 6 different national and local Latino and AAPI organizations. Speakers included Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA and Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda (NHLA), Kent Wong, Director of the UCLA Labor Center, Brent Wilkes, Executive Director of LULAC, Citalalli Chavez, DREAMer and Organizer with SEUI #1877, Francisco Duenas, Lambda Legal, Daniel Sharp, Legal Director of CARECEN, and Connie Chung, Attorney, Asian Americans Advancing Justice LA.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

LCLAA ENCOURAGED BIPARTISAN IMMIGRATION REFORM BILL CLEARS U.S. SENATE

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

June 27, 2013

LCLAA ENCOURAGED BIPARTISAN IMMIGRATION REFORM BILL CLEARS U.S. SENATE

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), which represents the interests of over 2 million Latino/a trade unionists throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, issued the following statement on the historic passage of the Immigration Reform Bill S. 744 in the U.S. Senate.

“This is an important and critical first step in fixing our broken immigration system,” said President of LCLAA, Milton Rosado . “For too long Congress has ignored our outdated immigration policies and stood on the sideline pointing blame at others for their lack of leadership. Today’s Senate vote will allow millions of aspiring Americans to become citizens and raise the working standards and pay for all workers. Although this bill provides a pathway to citizenship, a top priority Latino working families will not compromise on, we recognize this bill includes provisions that do not reflect the values of Americans. While these provisions aim to weaken the bill’s original intent, our nation will benefit from this bill since it will finally begin to address our immigration problems. We now call on the U.S. House of Representatives to follow the U.S. Senate’s lead and pass this historic bill.

“Although this legislation is far from perfect, we are encouraged the Senate has passed this bill. This bill ensures over 11 million undocumented immigrants a pathway to citizenship while helping reduce our national debt. This is an important victory for Latinos as we have mobilized our community to achieve something many pundits believed could not be done. The Senate’s overwhelming bipartisan support of this bill shows our communities power to affect change. We will now carefully monitor the House floor debate in the days and weeks ahead and urge House members to support the Senate bill and defeat any amendments that would undermine its core elements. LCLAA will ensure that the Latino community knows which House members stand with us. A vote against immigration reform is a vote against our community and we are ready to react to reform detractors at the ballot box in 2014,” said Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA.

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and on Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

LCLAA APPLAUDS U.S. SUPREME COURT'S RULING ON DOMA AND PROP 8

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

June 27, 2013

LCLAA APPLAUDS U.S. SUPREME COURT’S RULING ON DOMA AND PROPOSITION 8

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), which represents the interests of over 2 million Latino/a trade unionists throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s historic decision to rule the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and Proposition 8 (Prop 8) as unconstitutional. This ruling is a pivotal step towards achieving equality for all communities.

LCLAA is extremely pleased the Supreme Court recognized the rights of our LGBTQ brothers and sisters. This historic ruling is long overdue. The preservation and expansion of civil rights, liberties and federal benefits to all communities, including the LGBTQ community, is essential to the well-being of a democratic society. While this decision is a victory for LGBTQ and civil rights, there is still more work to be done to achieve true equality. LCLAA and its chapters will continue to fight and advocate for equal rights and protections for all,”Milton Rosado, President of LCLAA.

“The Supreme Court’s decision to reaffirm equal rights to all is a huge step forward for our nation. While we celebrate this important victory, we must continue advancing the fight for equality. Too many of our brothers and sisters are still experiencing civil rights injustice around the country. LCLAA will continue to stand in solidarity with the LGBTQ community and continue fighting for equality to create a more perfect and inclusive union,” said Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA.

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and on Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

LCLAA DEEPLY DISAPPOINTED WITH U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION ON SHELBY CO. V HOLDER CASE

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

June 26, 2013

LCLAA DEEPLY DISAPPOINTED WITH U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION ON SHELBY CO. V. HOLDER CASE

Supreme Court’s decision to strike down section 4 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 will negatively impact the voting and civil rights of underrepresented minorities

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), which represents the interests of over 2 million Latino/a trade unionists and working Latino families throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, issued the following statement on the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the Shelby Co. v. Holder Case.

“We are extremely disappointed by the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down sections of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA). This decision is a huge blow for the voting and civil rights of marginalized communities. It is because of the protections of the VRA that America’s democracy has grown more robust and inclusive over the past 50 years. The Court’s decision has weakened one of our most effective civil rights laws. Latino working families strongly believe in and support the safeguards in the VRA. LCLAA calls on Congress to swiftly reaffirm its commitment to fair and equal access to the ballot box,” said Milton Rosado, President of LCLAA.

“Tuesday's decision is a major setback to 50 years of progress for voting rights. The tools provided by the Voting Rights Act--and struck down by this wrongheaded decision—protect the rights of over 15 million Latinos in Florida, Texas, Georgia, and Arizona. Thirty-two percent of Latinos in the U.S. live in the jurisdiction covered by the section 4. The evidence is clear that discrimination against minority voters persists, especially against Hispanic voters. The Supreme Court has chosen to ignore this evidence. Latino voters call on both parties in Congress to quickly restore the full protections of the Voting Rights Act,” said Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA.

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and on Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

Press Releases - May 2013

50 STATES UNITED FOR HEALTHY AIR AMBASSADORS CALL FOR STRONGER AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

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Press Release

For Immediate Release

May 13, 2013

50 STATES UNITED FOR HEALTHY AIR AMBASSADORS CALL FOR STRONGER AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

WASHINGTON, D.C.— This week nine representatives of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) will participate in the 50 States United for Healthy Air. This campaign calls on Congress and the Obama administration to enforce and strengthen clean air standards. The nine LCLAA Clean Air Ambassadors represent eight states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Michigan,Minnesota, New York) and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. They will meet with officials from theb U.S. Environmental Protections Agency and their Members of Congress.

"Strengthening air standards is critical for the Latino community. Our community is affected by poor air quality. Latinos are three times more likely than any other racial group to die from asthma. LCLAA fully supports improving air standards both in our communities and at the workplace. Polls show that Latinos are overwhelmingly concerned about the environment and global warming. Now more than ever we need significant environmental awareness and action for a healthy future,” said President of LCLAA, Milton Rosado.

“Enforcing and improving environmental protections is an important priority for LCLAA and its membership. Over 43 percent of Latinos are exposed to pollution because they live or work near a toxic site, a coal-fired power plant, an agricultural field, a major highway, or a factory. Pollution and poor air quality standards are grossly impacting our communities. That is why LCLAA and our nice Clean Air Ambassadors will continue to call for stricter air quality standards on the federal, state, and local level,” said Executive Director of LCLAA, Hector E. Sanchez.

50 States United for Healthy Air, held during May 13–16, 2013, is a citizens advocacy event bringing together more than a hundred concerned members of the public from across the nation to Washington. 

The 2013 event is coordinated in partnership with the American Nurses Association (ANA), Earthjustice, Hip Hop Caucus, Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), National Council of Churches (NCC), National Latino Coalition on Climate Change (NLCCC) and Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). 

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families. LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process. LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations  (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership. Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

LATINO WORKERS DEMAND CONFIRMATION OF NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD NOMINEES

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For Immediate Release
May 17, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C.— On behalf of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the House of Latino Labor, which represents the interests of over 2 million Latino/a trade unionist throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, Milton Rosado, President of LCLAA and Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA issued the following statement on the delay by the U.S. Senate to confirm President Obama’s nominees to the National Labor Relations Board.

"We are really disappointed with the tone of obstructionism that has taken over the U.S. Senate. It seems that partisan politics has trumped solving the pressing problems our country faces. Delaying critical votes such as confirming Tom Perez as Labor Secretary and approving the NLRB nominees is putting American workers in serious danger. This is especially true for Latino workers, who have the highest workplace fatality rate in the nation. We have to ensure our workers are safe on the job. Confirming the NLRB nominees guarantee workers their rights and safety. We urge the U.S. Senate to stop playing political games and confirm the NLRB nominees,” said President of LCLAA, Milton Rosado.

“The lack of leadership at the NLRB and DOL is a serious concern for Latino workers. At a time when our economy is improving and more Americans are returning to the workplace, we need to ensure that worker rights and safety regulations are being enforced. The repeated attempts in the Senate to block the NLRB nominations are not just a concern for workers, but for the nation as a whole. The inability for the NLRB to do its work is causing many to be illegally discriminated and excluded from the workplace. This is driving people back to the unemployment line. Our country deserves better! The U.S. Senate needs to put its constituents first and quickly confirm the NLRB nominees,” said Executive Director of LCLAA, Hector E. Sanchez.

FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES, CONTACT: Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

 

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

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LABOR COUNCIL FOR LATIN AMERICAN ADVANCMENT APPLAUDS COMMITTEE APPROVAL OF THOMAS PEREZ

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For Immediate Release
May 16, 2013

LABOR COUNCIL FOR LATIN AMERICAN ADVANCEMENT APPLAUDS COMMITTEE APPROVAL OF THOMAS PEREZ

WASHINGTON, D.C.— On behalf of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), the house of Latino labor, which represents the interests of over 2 million Latino/a trade unionist throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, Milton Rosado, President of LCLAA and Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA issued the following statement on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee approval of Thomas Perez’s nomination for Secretary of Labor.

"We are very pleased the Senate HELP committee cleared Mr. Perez’s nomination for a full Senate vote. Latino workers fully support Mr. Perez nomination and we hope the Senate can act quickly to confirm him. We are confident that his experience and commitment to public service will serve our country well. We urge to the Senate to confirm him swiftly so he can begin his
work to enforce wage laws, job safety standards, and anti-discrimination laws,” said President of LCLAA, Milton Rosado.

Today’s HELP committee vote is an important step in the right direction. Tom Perez has extensive experience of advocating and defending working families. At a time when the country is looking to government to lead and create jobs, we need a leader like Tom in the Department of Labor. We are encouraged by today’s vote and ask the full Senate to swiftly confirm Tom as our
next Secretary of Labor,” said Executive Director of LCLAA, Hector E. Sanchez.

FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES, CONTACT: Victor Baten | Policy & Advocacy Coordinator | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 202.508.6989

 

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Press Releases - February 2013

NATION’S TOP LATINO CIVIL RIGHTS GROUPS JOIN GLOBAL BOYCOTT OF HYATT HOTELS

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For Immediate Release

February 26, 2013

                                                                                                   

NATION’S TOP LATINO CIVIL RIGHTS GROUPS JOIN GLOBAL BOYCOTT OF HYATT HOTELS

Groups join growing list of supporters urging Hyatt to improve substandard working conditions for housekeeping staff

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) and joined a global boycott of Hyatt hotels in response to widespread evidence of harmful working conditions for hotel housekeepers, who are predominantly women of color, including Latinas.  The groups pledged to not hold any conventions, conferences, special events or major meetings at Hyatt hotels covered by the boycott.

 

UNITE HERE announced the boycott on July 23, 2012.  Since then, the effort to push for the improvement of working conditions and ensure the right of workers to organize has received increasing support from more than 5,000 individuals and organizations, including the AFL-CIO, the NFL Players Association, the National Organization of Women (NOW), Feminist Majority, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Netroots Nation and Interfaith Worker Justice.  To date, the boycott has cost the company more than $27 million in business.

 

"A majority of the Hyatt hotel workers are women. LCLAA supports the boycott to fight back against unscrupulous employers who abuse theirTrabajadoras (women workers) by using tactics such as replacing their longtime employees with overworked minimum-wage temporary workers." Milton Rosado, President for the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. 

 

“We will not stand by and allow anyone to continue to profit on the injured backs of our trabajadoras (women workers).  In our research for ourTrabajadoras report, data showed that hotel workers are more likely to report injuries on the job if they know they have the right to do so and are associated with organizations that will back them if they are subjected to employer retaliation.  We proudly join the thousands of individuals and organizations in supporting the Hyatt trabajadoras through this global Hyatt boycott,” said Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director for the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement.

 

“The pattern of exploitation of housekeepers in Hyatt hotels is not only at odds with Hyatt’s commitment to hospitality but also inexcusable.  For years, Latina housekeepers and their supporters have asked for the most basic and humane changes in the workplace to help reduce injuries and physical strain.  We are joining these courageous workers in calling on Hyatt to stop this pattern of abuse and become an industry leader in respecting workers’ health and safety,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. 

 

In a study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine examining a total of 50 hotel properties from five different hotel companies, Hyatt housekeepers had the highest injury rate of all housekeepers studied when compared by hotel company.

 

The too-often unseen and ignored workers who ensure a comfortable stay at hotels like Hyatt deserve respect and scrupulous adherence to their rights under law,” stated Thomas A. Saenz, President and General Counsel of MALDEF.  “The global boycott of Hyatt sends a clear statement that consumers expect hotel operators to operate consistently with well-established principles of decency and fairness.”

 

LCLAA, NCLR and MALDEF are calling on Hyatt to:

  • Improve working conditions and reduce physical strain for housekeepers by complying with the recommendations outlined in a letter sent to Hyatt by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) on April 25, 2012.
  • Agree to the workers’ request to remain neutral when nonunion workers try to organize.
  • Settle expired collective bargaining agreements with worker representatives on terms comparable to other major hotel chains, such as Marriott, Blackstone/Hilton and Starwood.

FOR MORE INFORMATION regarding the boycott, visit www.hyatthurts.org.

FOR MEDIA ENQUIRIES, CONTACT: Diana Villa | Communications Manager |  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  | 202.508.6989

 

 

 

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Press Releases - January 2013

Latino Labor Optimistic for Immigration Reform

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For Immediate Release
January 30, 2013

LAS VEGAS, NV—LCLAA was present as President Obama announced his plans on immigration reform. We welcome the efforts of the President to move forward with an immigration policy that includes a pathway to citizenship for millions of undocumented workers who have so vigorously contributed to our country’s economy, and want nothing more than to achieve the American Dream.

The Latino influence on the outcomes of this past election season mandates immediate action. We denounce any language that seeks to prolong a path to citizenship and ignores the decades long worth of strife that these immigrant communities have endured. It is time that these workers are granted full rights and equal protection under law.

“The Senators’ announcement, coupled with President Obama’s release of his Administration’s immigration reform principles is a clear sign that the time to act on immigration reform is now. We are mindful that the devil is in the details and that we must continue to work to ensure that eligibility requirements of any bill do not unfairly exclude working families.” -- Milton Rosado, LCLAA President

“The Latino giant was wide awake this past election season and demands to be heard. No longer can politicians ignore the failing immigration system that operates on the backs of 11 million plus immigrant workers in the shadows of our profiting country. We need legislation that acknowledges and reflects the dignity of the immigrant workers that work for their children, pay their taxes and contribute to our economy.”-- Hector E. Sanchez, LCLAA Executive Director

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Diana Villa | LCLAA | 202-508-6989

Trabajadores Latinos Optimistas sobre la Reforma Migratoria.

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For Immediate Release
January 30, 2013

Trabajadores Latinos Optimistas sobre la Reforma Migratoria.

LAS VEGAS, NV- LCLAA estuvó presente durante el discurso del Presidente Obama donde anunció sus planes sobre la reforma migratoria. Acogemos con beneplácito los esfuerzos del Presidente para seguir adelante con una política de inmigración que incluya el camino hacia la ciudadanía para millones de trabajadores indocumentados que han contribuido con tanto vigor a la economía de nuestro país, y quienes solo buscan alcanzar el sueño americano.

La influencia latina en los resultados de la pasada temporada electoral, demanda una acción inmediata. Denunciamos cualquier declaración que busque prolongar el camino a la obtención de la ciudadanía e ignore las décadas de larga lucha que estas comunidades de inmigrantes han aguantado. Es hora de que a estas y estos trabajadores se les conceda el pleno uso de sus derechos y la misma protección bajo la ley.

“El anuncio de los Senadores, donde concuerdan con el presidente Obama y su administración en cuanto a los principios de la reforma migratoria es una clara señal de que el momento de actuar sobre esta reforma es ahora. Estamos conscientes de que lo importante está en los detalles y que debemos seguir trabajando para garantizar que los requisitos de elegibilidad de cualquier proyecto de ley no excluya injustamente a las familias trabajadoras "-. Milton Rosado, Presidente de LCLAA

"La fuerza de la comunidad latina estuvo completamente despierta durante el pasado proceso electoral y exige ahora ser escuchada. Los políticos ya no podrán hacer caso omiso al deficiente sistema de inmigración en el beneficiando a nuestro país viven a la sombra 11 millones de trabajadores inmigrantes. Necesitamos una legislación que reconozca y refleje la dignidad de los inmigrantes que trabajan por sus hijos, pagan sus impuestos y contribuyen a nuestra economía "-. Héctor E. Sánchez, Director Ejecutivo de LCLAA

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Contacto: Diana Villa, 202.508.6989

LCLAA Hails Secretary Solis' Tenure As Head Of the Department Of Labor

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For Immediate Release
January 10, 2013

LCLAA Hails Secretary Solis' Tenure As Head Of the Department Of Labor

WASHINGTON, D.C.- Yesterday, Labor Secretary Hilda L. Solis, the first and only Latina in a top cabinet post, announced her decision to resign. The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) hails Secretary Hilda Solis for her unrelenting commitment to working-families during her tenure at the Labor Department.As head of the Department, Secretary Solis succeeded in improving working conditions, increasing enforcement of labor laws, and increasing employment opportunities for all Americans.
 
Secretary Solis has never lost sight of her own working-class roots or her Latino heritage. Her time at the Labor Department is marked with accomplishment on behalf of these communities. She brought "Labor" back to the Department of Labor and always stood on the side of workers. Under her guidance, the agency held the first-ever Latino Worker Safety Summit to address safety and health issues, and issued long-awaited standards  to protect workers in industries with the highest rates of work-related injuries and deaths. In addition, one of Secretary Solis' first actions was to increase the number of Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) inspectors and, in 2012, the Department collected more than $280 million in back wages.
 
Milton Rosado, President of LCLAA, stated,
"LCLAA leaders have always supported Hilda Solis as a State legislator and through her confirmation because she embodied the democratic ideals that recognize the importance of having a collective voice. As cabinet member, she worked to strike fear into the minds of unscrupulous employers. We are sad to see this champion for working families leave, but wish our long-time friend the best in her future endeavors. We hope that President Obama continues to appoint leadership that represents our growing demographic and who, like she, recognizes that what is necessary for the well-being of working families is also vital to the progress of our nation."
 
Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of LCLAA, stated, "Secretary Solis is a longtime friend of LCLAA. She exemplifies the best of our Latino community and the labor movement.  From the moment she took office four years ago, employers knew that the sheriff was back in town to enforce labor laws on behalf of the most vulnerable workers in our country, a majority of whom are Latinos. We are honored to have had such a strong champion for Latino working-families.  While we will deeply miss her as Secretary of Labor, we know that whatever she chooses to do, she will remain a strong advocate for workers."
 

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is the leading national organization for Latino(a) workers and their families.   LCLAA was born in 1972 out of the need to educate, organize and mobilize Latinos in the labor movement and has expanded its influence to organize Latinos in an effort to impact workers' rights and their influence in the political process.  LCLAA represents the interest of more than 2 million Latino workers in the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), The Change to Win Federation, Independent Unions and all its membership.Visit LCLAA on the web at www.lclaa.org, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Diana Villa | LCLAA | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | (202) 508-6989