31. TERMINATE SCHWARZENEGGER'S MINIMUM WAGE ORDER

lclaaLCLAA 17TH NATIONAL MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION
ORLANDO, FL
AUGUST 4-8, 2008

RESOLUTION:  31.  TERMINATE SCHWARZENEGGER’S MINIMUM WAGE ORDER

Whereas: Governor Schwarzenegger’s cynical and mean spirited Order to terminate thousands of state workers and to slash California state workers’ salaries to the Federal minimum wage of $6.55/hour is a senseless diversion designed to shift blame from his own and his party’s failure to balance the California budget; and his failure to provide leadership. and

Whereas: Outraged at the governor’s plan to slash state workers’ pay to $6.55 per hour, workers are rallying frequently all over the state of California, telling the governor that workers will not be used and abused, whether in a political budget game or otherwise.

Whereas: While gas costs and foreclosures are rising, home values are plummeting and health insurance is increasingly unaffordable; while California is in crisis, the Governor has failed to make things better in California and is now trying to use state workers as pawns in a political game to get a budget passed; and

Whereas: Such Draconian measures threaten to seriously damage the lives of hundreds of thousands of workers and their families, preventing them from maintaining their homes, their children’s education and their way of life; and

Whereas: This Order would necessarily cause many state workers to seek other employment, and thereby further reduce the already compromised ability of the State of California and its government to provide services and operate effectively; and

Whereas: There are more logical and cost effective means to reduce California’s budget deficit of $15.2 billion dollars, including the raising of revenues.

Whereas: California Controller John Chiang has taken a stand in support of the workers saying that the state has enough money to pay its bills this month, including the salaries of all state workers at the full rate. “Preserving their full payment and their salary is the right thing to do,” Allies are lining up with Public workers to oppose governor’s action. A strong coalition of allies in the fight against the governor’s actions is forming which includes a number of top-ranking state officials. Lt. Governor John Garamendi and state Treasurer Bill Lockyer have joined in challenging the executive order. Scores of California legislators, 27 members of the California Congressional delegation and Union locals statewide have added their support, along with more than 30,000 Californians who have signed petitions opposing the governor.

Whereas: Lawsuits seeking to block the governor’s wage cuts and mass layoffs were filed immediately after the governor’s executive order, saying his actions violate provisions of the California constitution and state regulations governing personnel actions pertaining to state employees.

Therefore Be It Resolved: That LCLAA will mobilize its forces to help in the fight to nullify Governor Schwarzenegger’s Executive Order and its effects.

Finally Be It Resolved: Public workers are the backbone of essential services and deserve a fair wage for a fair day’s work. Any Governor or other politician who tries to balance a budget on the backs of working people and their families, and uses workers as pawns in a political budget game, must be condemned and held accountable. Playing with workers’ lives and livelihoods cannot be tolerated.

15. Support of Retiring Roberto Clemente’s #21 From Major League Baseball

lclaaLCLAA 17TH NATIONAL MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION
ORLANDO, FL
AUGUST 4-8, 2008

RESOLUTION: 
15.    Support of Retiring Roberto Clemente’s #21 From Major League Baseball

Whereas: baseball legend and humanitarian Roberto Clemente who was born in Carolina, Puerto Rico on August 18, 1934, played major league baseball for eighteen seasons (1955 – 1972) for the Pittsburgh Pirates, and died December 31, 1972, on an airplane while carrying supplies destined for earthquake victims in Nicaragua, and

Whereas: elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, only the second player for whom the mandatory five (5) year waiting period was waived – Lou Gehrig was the other, collected 3000 hits, won four batting titles – leading the National League batting average, had a lifetime batting average of .317, voted “National League Most Valuable Player” in 1966, was the “Most Valuable Player” in the 1971 World Series, hit safely – at least one hit – in all 14 World Series games in which he played (1960 & 1971), and

Whereas: playing in the Mid-west steel town of Pittsburgh in the 1950’s and 1960’s, he faced and overcame the double minority status of race and language, during spring training refused to accept the indignity of “Jim Crow” segregation in the American South, and would not accept food from “White Only” restaurants, had a passion for young fans, and was a superstar athlete who always gave back to the community in which he played, and

Whereas: following the 1971 World Series, in which he was named “Most Valuable Player”, he insisted upon speaking first in his native language (Spanish) on national television an act which infused a sense of dignity and self-esteem for Hispanics throughout the Western Hemisphere, even those who knew little or nothing of the game of baseball, was the undisputed leader on the field of the 1971 World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates, a diverse international collection of gifted and talented athletes, and

Whereas: Roberto Clemente disregarding his own safety, flew in the rear of a cargo plane to bring vital supplies to earthquake victims because his physical presence would ensure that the supplies would reach those in need, this act of sacrifice was not a staged photo-op or a public relations stunt arranged for the cameras, but an outpouring of compassion and humanitarian concern, his act was an act of genuine heroism, not “check-book”
compassion, which we can admire, respect and emulate, Roberto Clemente’s humanitarian concern stretched beyond the island of Puerto Rico and his legacy can be embraced around the World, and

Whereas: Roberto Clemente’s life and death were heroic in his concern for others, courage in the face of danger, and the nobility and pride which he exuded – America is in need of such heroes, for every Latino player whether superstar or minor league hopeful stands on the shoulders of Roberto Clemente and owes to him a debt which can never be repaid, for after thirty-five (35) years after his death, those who never saw him play, or have little knowledge of baseball, revere his memory, and honor his humanitarian ideals, finding the name of Roberto Clemente at baseball fields and athletic complexes, but schools, libraries, parks, and highways bear his name in the United States and internationally, as a fitting memorial to a great athlete and an even greater human being, and

Whereas: Robert Clemente’s life, death, and legacy, represent and symbolize the many contributions made by Puerto Ricans to the history of the United States, this native of Carolina, Puerto Rico, has left a legacy that transcends the Hispanic community, and

Whereas: only one number, #42, the number worn by Brooklyn Dodger great Jackie Robinson, has been retired by Major League Baseball, and if Roberto Clemente’s number is retired, it will not diminish the greatness of Jackie Robinson, but will only highlight the legacy of two extraordinary human beings, for when future generations enter a major league stadium and ask, “What does that number 21 on the outfield wall mean?”, the heroism of Roberto Clemente and his memory will come alive again in the retelling, for Roberto Clemente is not a “hero” because he can hit, catch, and throw a baseball with great skill, but because of a life of service to others and a life lost in an attempt to help others, hence,
Therefore be it resolved: that the National Labor Council for Latin American Advancement at its’ 2008 national convention in Orlando, Florida, wholeheartedly promote support for the retirement of Roberto Clemente’s #21 from Major League Baseball, with all its members and affiliates, inclusive of the AFL-CIO and the Change to Win Federations urging its affiliates as well as contacting the respective congressional representatives in both the House of Representatives and the Senate to get on board in signing on in support of the national campaign for the retirement of Roberto Clemente’s #21 from Major League Baseball.

Respectfully submitted by: 

New York City LCLAA Chapter
Albany/Capital District Chapter
Westchester County LCLAA Chapter                                                                                

REFERRED TO THE COMMITTEE: SPECIAL ISSUES COMMITTEE

CONCURRENCE:_______________________________________

NON-CONCURRENCE:___________________________________

29. RESOLUTION REAFFIRMING SUPPORT FOR COMPENSATION FOR PANAMANIAN PORT WORKERS DISPLACED BY CARTER/TORRIJOS PANAMA CANAL TREATY

lclaaLCLAA 17TH NATIONAL MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION
ORLANDO, FL
AUGUST 4-8, 2008


RESOLUTION:

29.    RESOLUTION REAFFIRMING SUPPORT FOR COMPENSATION FOR PANAMANIAN PORT WORKERS DISPLACED BY CARTER/TORRIJOS PANAMA CANAL TREATY

Whereas, on July 29, 1996, the operation of the Port of Balboa was contracted to Hutchinson Whampao, LTD, a private firm; and

Whereas, over two thousand port workers were displaced by the privatization  process put into motion by the Carter/Torrijos Panama Canal agreement; and

Whereas, the Port Authority of Balboa and Cristobal and the central office of the past national Port Authority, now the Maritime Authority of Panama has refused to compensate those workers displaced by the Carter/Torrijos Panama Canal agreement; and

Whereas, on July 14, 1992, the Panamanian Assembly approved Article 22, Section 16, of said agreement which established a legal process for the privatization of public enterprises, properties and national services; and

Whereas, the approved Article 22, Section 16 provided for compensation, including salaries and benefits for displaced workers; and

Whereas, the government of Panama has guaranteed compensation in the sum of $12 million under agreement with the workers in September of 2005; and

Whereas, on August 10, 2007 the Officers of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) adopted a "Resolution in Support of Compensation for Port Workers Displaced by the Carter/Torrijos Panama Canal Agreement"; and

Therefore Be it Resolved, that the Maritime authority of Panama shall make whole all workers who have been displaced by the privatization of the canal; and

Be it Further Resolved, that the government of Panama and President Martin Torrijos Espino shall fulfill the negotiated agreement to provide the $12 million in compensation to the displaced workers; and

Be it Further Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) reaffirms its support for compensation for Port Workers Displaced by the Carter/Torrijos Panama Canal Agreement.

Respectfully introduced by:
Alejandro Stephens
Los Angeles County LCLAA Chapter

30. RESOLUTION OPPOSING EMPLOYMENT ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATION (BASIC PILOT E-VERIFY) AND CALLING FOR AN IMMEDIATE MORATORIUM ON WORKSITE RAIDS

lclaaLCLAA 17TH NATIONAL MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION
ORLANDO, FL
AUGUST 4-8, 2008


RESOLUTION:

30. RESOLUTION OPPOSING EMPLOYMENT ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATION (BASIC PILOT E-VERIFY) AND CALLING FOR AN IMMEDIATE MORATORIUM ON WORKSITE RAIDS

 

Whereas, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Social Security Administration (SSA) seek the mandatory use of the E-Verify system by all federal sector contractors; and

Whereas, in spite of continuing evidence that the databases on which Basic Pilot/E-Verify relies are plagued by inaccuracies and that a substantial percentage of the employers using the program abuse; and

Whereas, this mandatory E- Verify system if implemented would affect an estimated 4 million federal sector workers if applied to new employees and existing employees; and

Whereas, there is a concern for the broader and negative implications that an expansion of the use of E-Verify by all other sectors will have on the U.S. workforce; and

Whereas, Latino workers are among the most vulnerable and have a higher likelihood to be disproportionately affected by this program; and

Whereas, this program has the potential to be used as a union busting tactic by unscrupulous employers; and

Whereas, as a result, employers affected by the order may well engage in prohibited behavior such as using the program for purposes other than verifying employment eligibility or to prescreen employment candidates, resulting in discrimination against workers; and

Whereas, current escalation of worksite raids by ICE have further devastated Latino workers and their families by violating their human rights, constitutional and due process rights, and tearing apart the basic foundation of our families and consequently, our society;

Therefore Be It Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) states our unequivocal opposition to this pilot E-Verify program and commits to communicate our opposition to E-Verify through submission of public comments due no later than August 11, 2008; and

Be it Further Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) will communicate our opposition to the E-Verify to all government agencies, Congress and other elected officials;

Be it Further Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) will mobilize its chapters to take action and to oppose the implementation of E-Verify by any employer; and

Be it Further Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) calls for an immediate moratorium on worksite raids; and

Be it Finally Resolved, that the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) will call on its friends and allies to join us in this call for an end to the abuse caused by the worksite raids.

Respectfully Submitted By,
National LCLAA Executive Board

SUBMITTED TO COMMITTEE: RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE
CONCURRENCE:_____________________________________
NON-CONCURRENCE:________________________________

28. Cintas Employment Problems

lclaaLCLAA 17TH NATIONAL MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION
ORLANDO, FL
AUGUST 4-8, 2008


RESOLUTION:

28.    Cintas Employment Problems

WHEREAS, Cintas has been consistently failing to pay its employees the required wages from the employees corresponding states; it has also denied overtime pay for many years to its drivers; moreover, Cintas has a stated policy of pushing increase in insurance costs onto its workers; this organization has been found guilty of illegally firing and disciplining union supporters, threatening workers with plant closures and unlawful interrogations, among dozens of other charges;

WHEREAS, Cintas employees report earning wages around $7-$9 per hour, which forces many employees to support their families at a salary below the federal poverty line; employees should not have to worry about how to pay their bills nor live in poverty; they should get more then 5 to 10 cent raises; and

WHEREAS, the agency should provide affordable health care coverage to all of its employees; many of the employees have to choose to take insurance and sacrifice paying bills or buying food; Cintas workers should not have to rest on the hope that their families will remain healthy so that they can afford to buy groceries or pay the rent;

WHEREAS, the corporation should improve the working environment for its employees so that their safety is not threatened; two employees have died because of unsafe and illegal working conditions; other workers are required to work without protective equipment and many of the workers' accidents are covered up by Cintas; and

WHEREAS, workers should be treated with dignity and respect and not like machines; they should be treated as partners and as human beings and, as such, they should have the right to make proposals about working conditions; if attendance policies are deemed unfair or if employees see favoritism, they should be allowed to raise concerns; and

WHEREAS, Cintas should allow its employees to exercise their rights without fear of intimidation, punishment, or threats; this agency should remain neutral to employees who demand to be part of a union; and

WHEREAS, workplace hazards increasingly rob a disproportionate number of Latino families their loved ones, and it is time that companies like CINTAS, which employ a significant number of Latino workers, stop turning their backs on worker safety and take every step necessary to ensure that employees not only return to their families each day but also return home healthy; and

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, THAT LCLAA SUPPORTS UNITE HERE IN THEIR CAMPAIGNS TOWARDS CINTAS. WE ENCOURAGE THEIR EFFORTS TO UNIONIZE WORKERS UNDER THE AGENCY AND TO FIGHT FOR BETTER EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS. THESE CONDITIONS SHOULD INCLUDE MEETING THE LIVING WAGE SET BY THE CITIES ITS WORKERS LIVE IN, AS WELL AS INCLUDING HEALTH BENEFITS.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, THAT LCLAA WILL EDUCATE AND INFORM ITS MEMBERSHIP, COMMUNITIES AND ALLIES ABOUT THIS IMPORTANT ISSUE BY DISSEMINATING INFORMATION FOUND ON
HTTP://WWW.UNIFORMJUSTICE.ORG/ THROUGH ITS GET ACTIVE MESSAGE ALERT.